Ducking through the smaller door was very much like escaping the ordinary world: except this ordinary world had narrow streets, black cobbles as big as shoe boxes. "The Kills" by

"The Kills" - Richard House

by

Such buildings, a feature of the city, were referred to as palazzi. Palaces. The word lent a formal air and a sense of protection to the apartments and businesses inside, so that ducking through the smaller door was very much like escaping the ordinary world: except this ordinary world had narrow streets, black cobbles as big as shoe boxes, the constant buzz of Vespas. The hidden world housed wasps. Mizuki always paused at the door, tucked away her hair, drew her sleeves over her hands, and worried over the wasps and how she would cross the courtyard without being stung. "The Kills" by

‘The Kills’ is not an ordinary travel book. But two books and 519 pages into this epic metafictional thriller I was surprised to find myself in Naples. The smells, the heat, the chaos and the beauty are all there along with a pervading sense of mystery that is never quite resolved. Like sitting in a cafe listening to bits and pieces of conversation while trying to understand an argument on the corner, a woman rushing by in impossible high heels, and big boys weaving through dense traffic on their scooters without a crash helmet. Guess that’s travel to me. A sensory overload of interlinked stories waiting to be explored and interpreted.

 

Mette Vaabengaard is the author of Italian Notes. A passion driven blog about Italian food and travel.

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